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Friday, January 2, 2015

A New Life - Part 1

Happy New Year, Friday Fiction Fans!
You know, if it weren't for the faithfulness of you fans coming back each week to read something new, I probably would have quit blogging quite a while ago. So, thank you all for reading and commenting.
I hope you all had a good transition from 2014 into 2015. I did. I slept. :) I remember staying up one time till mid-night and that was the end of 1999-2000. Nothing exciting happened. A few fireworks went off, but everything looked the same, and I went to bed. I haven't stayed up till mid-night since.

After spending the earlier half of the week at my grandparents', we are back home and undecorating. We got a start yesterday, and should be finishing it up today. As much as I love decorating the house for Christmas, enjoying the soft glow of the white Christmas lights in the doorways, on the little trees and elsewhere in the evenings, I enjoy putting everything all away and getting the house back to "normal." I'm ready to get back to doing "normal" things. Like writing.

I probably won't start "Dr. Morgan" until next week, but I'm looking forward to it. I haven't any new ideas for it, so if you do, let me know! Perhaps I can also finish a few other short stories so I'll have something to post when this story ends. Or should I post "re-runs"? :)

This story was written for "Project 12" and was the January story. I hope you all enjoy it.

A New Life
Part 1

    The snowflakes, which had been small and light only thirty minutes ago, had become heavy and were falling thickly about me. It was cold, but not a penetrating cold where the wind cuts through coats no matter how thick they are, as though they were nothing, and chilling one to the very bone by its bitterness; this was a pleasant cold, brisk, invigorating, and the snow was lovely falling all around and rapidly covering up the drab grass and the few piles of ugly, dirty snow which still remained from the last snowfall.
    I paused on the sidewalk and gazed about. A new year, a new snowfall, a new house; all together it meant a new life for us. Tilting my face up, my eyes blinked as the large, fat flakes fell on my nose and hair. Glorious, that’s what it was! I gave a long sigh of contentment and then set off once more, thankful that the grocer’s boy had offered to bring the packages around in an hour. It would have been difficult to carry them, for the snow was making the streets a mess of slippery slush. Passing carriages or automobiles only churned up the roads and made them worse than before.
    Pulling my new coat closer about me, I hurried on. Little Mary Mildred would be waiting for me. How kind it was of Miss Catherine to promise to watch Baby so that I might run the errands for Cook and Mrs. Carmichael. I would have been nearly home now, how pleasant that word sounded, had it not been for the young girl I had found looking cold and hungry. I had only my car fare with me, but the thankfulness in her voice and face more than repaid the walking I now had to do.
    “For He is faithful that promised.” Softly I whispered those words and knew them to be true. Only two months ago I wouldn’t have even been able to spare a car fare. Even before I was married extra money was not plentiful even if I had been minded to bestow some of it on those in need.

* * * * *


    “Mary Louise! If you once leave this house to marry that man, you will never set foot in it again!” thundered Mr. Ryan as he stood before his daughter with flashing eyes and folded arms. His face was stern “Do I make myself clear?”
    “Perfectly, Father,” the daughter replied, her dark eyes flashing in the same way her father’s did, but her voice calmly quiet.
    “Than get back to your room.”
    “I will not. I am going to marry Robert McKinley, Father. Nothing you say or do will stop me.”
    “Mary Louise!” Mr. Ryan roared, “I forbid you to marry that man!”
    There was a toss of the small, brown head before the angry man and a quiet voice answered, “You already forbade me to think of him, but it didn’t work. I love him, Father, and I am going to marry him! If you won’t consent and give me your blessing, I’ll do without, but I cannot do without Robert McKinley!”
    There was a pause as the two equally strong-willed persons glared at each other. Neither one would give an inch, so at last, with a quiet, “Good bye, Father,” Mary Louise left her father’s house to join young Robert McKinley who was waiting for her.
    “He’ll break your heart!” shouted the irate father after the two young people.


* * * * *

    “Poor Father,” I thought, trudging onward. “And poor Robert. If only I knew where— No, I will not start thinking like that!” Resolutely I pushed the troublesome thoughts from my mind as I turned into the quiet, pleasant street where my new home was.
    I could see the house up the hill. The white sides of the large, pleasant home were not as distinct through the veil of quickly falling snow as they would be when surrounded by the green foliage on the large, old trees or the brilliant colors from the many gardens which surrounded it in summer. Its many windows looked dark, and I knew the members of the household must be in the back parts of the house. Guarded by two less than ferocious looking marble lions, the steps leading up to the corner porch held a blanket of snow. Smiling, I made my way around to the kitchen door. I was home.
    “There you are, Mary,” Cook exclaimed in relief. “Miss Catherine was worried about you and Mr. Carmichael was going to go out looking for you if you didn’t come soon. You’d best go right out there and relieve their minds as well as Baby’s. Though to be sure I’ve scarcely heard a sound from her.”
    As she spoke I quickly took off my coat and rubbers and then leaving Cook still talking to herself, I hurried upstairs.
    “Oh, Mary, I’m so glad you’re home! Father, Mary is home,” Miss Catherine called into the library. Then she turned to me once more. “When the car came and went and you didn’t appear I began to think something had happened to you. Mother has Baby and she’s been as good as gold.”
    Her mixed pronouns made me laugh.
    “But where were you, Mary?” Miss Catherine continued before I could hurry away to my little one.
    “Yes, Mary,” Mr. Carmichael’s deep, kind voice added as he came from the library, “what kept you so long?”
    “I tried to hurry, but I walked home instead of taking the cars. I’m so sorry you were worried.”
    “Walked! In this weather? Why you must be frozen! Come right into the library. Papa has a good fire going, and I’ll have Cook bring you a cup of hot tea.” Miss Catherine was in a flutter. “But why did you walk, Mary? Didn’t you have enough money for the fare?”
    Laughing, I pulled back and replied, “I’m not cold a bit. Why this snow is very invigorating and I enjoyed every minute of my walk, but I must go tend to Mary Mildred.”

Did you enjoy this start?
Any idea for "Dr. Morgan" are welcome!

3 comments:

Rebekah Eddy said...

I loved the start, but I'm fresh out of ideas...at least for now... :) I'll definitely be back for more though! :D

Amy said...

It was cold, but not a penetrating cold where the wind cuts through coats no matter how thick they are, as though they were nothing, and chilling one to the very bone by its bitterness; this was a pleasant cold, brisk, invigorating, and the snow was lovely falling all around and rapidly covering up the drab grass and the few piles of ugly, dirty snow which still remained from the last snowfall.
This sentence does not quit make sense, well it does, but I think maybe you could try to reword the beginning of it?

Rebekah said...

Hi Amy,
I don't think I'll reword this sentence for a few reasons. One, is that I was trying for a sentence like this and I like it. :) Two is that so many readers now days have gotten stuck in the modern rut of short sentences, and they can't or won't take the time to carefully read a longer one, and I am not going to cater to that way. Sometimes long sentences are put in for the purpose of slowing the story down or at least the reader. Sometimes they set the stage, as this one does, for a slower story.
But thanks for commenting about it. :)